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STIBA: Against the scrappage scheme

In a recent article, Stiba General Secretary, Stefan Cabri points out how the Dutch vehicle dismantling association, Stiba is ‘absolutely against the scrapping scheme because it undermines the market and earning potential of its 132 active members.’ 

 

STIBA against scrappage scheme post

Through their vehicle dismantling activities, Stiba’s members have invested in reusable parts stock, with more than 40 percent of it concerning vehicles 2009 and older, which coincidentally is the same age as those vehicles entering the scrappage scheme, in particular, diesels. 

Stiba General Secretary, Stefan Cabri said: 

“We have worked hard to ensure the reuse of parts by the car and body repair company. It is not without reason that the B2B turnover of our members has now averaged 60 percent. For that reason alone, a scrapping scheme to promote the sale of new passenger cars is absolutely undesirable.” He added: “You also have to ask yourself whether the consumer in that segment is currently able to purchase a new car. They don’t drive an old car for nothing. Even with a premium of a few thousand euros you do not cross that. With the knowledge of the previous scrapping scheme from 2009/2010, the government itself also knows that the effect of a scrapping scheme is nil. ”

According to the article, Stiba and other aftermarket parties view conflict with those of Director-General Eric-Mark Huitema of the European Automobile Manufacturers’ Association (Acea), which ‘urges European governments to urgently purchase incentives and scrapping schemes “to create much-needed demand for new cars” and limit damage to the car industry.’

Acea expects 9.6 million new cars by 2020, a decrease of 25 percent from the 12.8 million sold last year.

Source: www.aftersalesmagazine.nl

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